Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2007

Happy Hallow-weird!

Tomorrow I will be posting each and every day in November as part of NaBloPoMo or National Blog Posting Month. It is part of my ongoing effort to keep everyone up-to-date with our adoption process while creating a record for our child to be. I hope you will join me in my challenge.

Since I have a month of intense writing ahead of me, I am opting for a easy post today. I hope you had a Happy Halloween – I know our poodle certainly did not enjoy his costume.

matisse-halloween.jpg

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Many friends and family have asked what they can do to help us as we adopt from Ethiopia. Other than support, I have a strange reply: Buy Fair Trade Ethiopian Coffee.

Historically and culturally coffee is incredibly important to Ethiopia. Quoted below is an excerpt from a Selamta Publication (volume 13, number 2) article that outlines the historical significance of coffee to Ethiopia:

More than 1,000 years ago, a goatherd in Ethiopia’s south-western highlands plucked a few red berries from some young green trees growing there in the forest and tasted them. He liked the flavour – and the feel-good effect that followed. Today those self-same berries, dried, roasted and ground, have become the world’s second most popular non-alcoholic beverage after tea. And, as David Beatty discovers in words and pictures, the Ethiopian province where they first blossomed – Kaffa – gave its name to coffee.

Want to learn more? Read the whole article at this link.

Coffee is also a significant export for the Ethiopian economy, with over 60% of their export product being coffee. Noting how much I pay for a cup of plain black coffee at a designer chain coffee house or even for a pound of beans at the grocery, one may assume that the coffee industry would be a decent business to get into.

Good for the corporations, bad for the farmer. To quote the documentary mentioned below, for every 3 dollar drink purchased at a chain coffee house, the farmers sees .03 cents. The farmer sees a whopping 1% of the profit. Are you convinced to buy fair trade yet?

I have only seen part of the documentary Black Gold, Wake Up and Smell the Coffee, by Nick & Marc Francis when it aired on PBS and since I have made a concerted effort to buy Ethiopian beans. I am trying to locate a copy of this not-so-uplifting documentary for a couch date with myself this weekend.

Check out the trailer below from YouTube.

Since I am perched on my soapbox, one more little request: avoid Starbucks for yet another reason or two. Also, if you live near me, Peace Coffee roasts a pretty good Ethiopian bean. You can even read their fair trade agreement with Ethiopia on their website.

Read Full Post »